Tiny Couch Review

The Foreigner, 2017

  • lucidunicorn
    lucidunicorn
    Primal Critic

    31 posts
    Signed up the 29/03/2017

    On 04/12/2017 at 13:14 Quote this message

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    The Foreigner is a 2017 action directed by Martin Campbell and stars Jackie Chan and Pierce Brosnan in lead roles. The film follows Quan Ngoc Minh (Chan) who seeks justice when his daughter is killed in an act of terrorism. He goes on the hunt for the killers' identities, while discovering that a politician (Brosnan) and his shady past might be responsible.

    We live in a post Taken era where a film like this will surely be compared to it and its only fitting since the film follows Taken’s formula and aesthetics but yet it misses it’s mark and gets lost within the sub-plots and other short fallings.

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    The sub-plot of a political conspiracy is one that is all too common in these type of films and most of them rely on their action sequences to keep the audiences numb so that they don’t question the loop holes, while others try to have a tighter story by sacrificing its thrills.

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    Jackie Chan and Pierce Brosnan in the lead roles playing characters you’d least expect from them and actually nailing it is my favourite part of the film. The first half of the film FOOLED me playing like a balanced intense drama that promises to take Chan’s character to a dark place as the film progresses.

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    Once I settled into it, it became a Taken-esque actioner that I was hoping it would avoid, providing some pretty good moments here and there (I especially enjoyed the beginning of the forest sequence as it does “show don’t tell” brilliantly, we really find out about Chan’s character before the film falls into the clichés), but eventually the film gets stuck in developing the story, which could have set it apart from the rest.

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    Jackie Chan proves why he’s a martial arts action icon even in old age. The film finally gets to the point but like most of its body, it's not something that feels fresh or different, instead its clichéd and somewhat lazy writing that relied on Jackie Chan's kung fu chops and not acting chops which is one of the film’s winning qualities.

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    Overall, the film is full of clichés and actually misuses Jackie as a glorified action star instead of an actual actor. This does a great injustice to film as it really required less bombs (lol) and more story. A potential for greatness but ends up being meh.

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