Tiny Couch Review

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, 2017

  • LeratoEnchanted
    LeratoEnchanted
    Moderator
    Grandmaster Critic

    127 posts
    Signed up the 28/03/2017

    On 08/05/2017 at 12:55 Quote this message

    Image

    Mild spoilers follow.

    With all the excitement on social media following the release of James Gunn's second installment of his starry, colourful adventure film Guardians of the Galaxy, I had to immidiately go see for myself what all the commission was about. And, I guess, I didn't regret being in that theatre- for the most part. It's a Guardians film afterall, you're bound to have fun and let out a few giggles- as a friend and I hazily concluded, to avoid taking out the encisors to truly break it all down.

    But that's what I'm here to do now, in my own theory, anyway- unpack! Now, the opening fight sequence is pretty rad and gets the ball rolling for the rest of the adventure- as the Guardians spectacularly fight off the gigantic, slimy Abilisk. (And, hey, look! It's baby Groot). We soon after discover that the group was hired by Ayesha and the Sovereign to protect some obviously important batteries. Racoon goes on to have sticky fingers and keeps some of these same batteries for himself. This sets the tone for the rest of the film, as we get to see Ayesha and her group in hot pursuit of the Guardians. So much that she hires Yondu and his bunch of rascals to hunt them down.

    Now, there is a lot happening in this film- in fact, for me, too much for some two hours screen time. Peter Quill's (Star-Lord) father, Ego (played by a smooth Kurt Russell), appears out of nowhere- the deadbeat he is- and begins to persuade Peter into embracing his heritage. (Sidenote: Ayesha, at the beginning of the film, scornfully asks Peter: "What is your heritage, Mr. Quill?" a question which Peter is seemingly uncomfortable with).

    Ego shows his son his very own planet, and Peter seems to be highly impressed by the "god" (small letter "g" emphasised) that is his father- a person he so direly yearned for for most of his life. Well, plot-twist!, Ego later turns out to be a manipulative scumbag. This centres the story around family that Vol. 2 so tirelessly works towards. The build up to this great plot seems slow and just simply Marvel trying too hard to change the narrative around its movies being hollow shells at first, but they manage to tie it all up quite nicely in the end. Yondu plays a great role in introducing true emotion and great sacrifice to the film.

    There's a scene, towards the end, where Drax shouts "where's Quill", which goes on to echo into a burning frame, that is particularly home-hitting. I appreciated the film that much more over this one scene.

    There were a lot of lazy writing moments- which, though, were luckily saved (side-eye) by the other many plots to truly put a bad taste in our mouths. One is where Ego reveals that he was the one responsible for Peter's mother falling ill. This very confession is how Peter managed to break from his father's spell, to go on to battle him so he could save the rest of the universe from his evil plan. I don't understand why Ego would brave the risk of Peter getting upset over his mother being murdered by his own father when he is in the middle of an important ritual in which he attempts to use him to gain access to the rest of the universe. I mean, a Celestial, a god, must have known that his son- who is part-mortal- would be very, very upset upon knowing what truly caused his mother's death.

    Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 is overall a great film to kick back and watch. To another friend, I mentioned that I wasn't sure, at the time, which Guardians film was my favourite. But upon this analysis, Vol. 1 is the better film. Vol. 2, though, contributes some really cool, enjoyable additions to the franchise nonetheless.

    Gamora and her sister's family feud contributed to many tear-jerking moments. Racoon being called multiple names like "rat" and "fox" other than his own was at the centre of the humor, along with baby Groot's dimwitted charm. I didn't like how Drax kept being mean to Mantis and calling her "ugly" and that the writing team expected us to jiggle our bellies at this, but Mantis herself was a great addition to the ensemble, and was a complete joy to watch. All I could think for most of the film was "the crew at Guardians is sure into machine guns". Also, Ego might or might not be Ultron without the metal suit.
  • lucidunicorn
    lucidunicorn
    Super Critic

    60 posts
    Signed up the 29/03/2017

    On 08/05/2017 at 13:19 Quote this message

    Another wasted villain and I totes agree with the whole "I'm responsible for your mother's illness" thing and also the Drax being mean to an underused Mantis just proves that Marvel treats women extremely horribly even though they do have female leads, they somehow able to squeeze in their misogynistic ways but I loved the colour of the film.
  • LeratoEnchanted
    LeratoEnchanted
    Moderator
    Grandmaster Critic

    127 posts
    Signed up the 28/03/2017

    On 08/05/2017 at 14:11 Quote this message

    I'm particularly shocked at the current narrative on film publications insisting that Ego "solves Marvel's villian problem". Like? Riiight! That "I'm responsible for your mother dying" was dropping the ball, ugh! Also, Drax-Mantis exchange was just too angering to watch hey. The way the watered her down was insulting- reminded me of that "do I always have to pick up after you boys" line by Black Widow on Age of Ultron. Such blatant misogyny and we're supposed to find it "cute". Euw!

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