Tiny Couch Review

Autopsy of Jane Doe, 2016

  • lucidunicorn
    lucidunicorn
    Primal Critic

    37 posts
    Signed up the 29/03/2017

    On 20/06/2017 at 14:41 Quote this message

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    The Autopsy of Jane Doe is a 2016 supernatural horror film directed by André Øvredal. The film stars OG actor Brian Cox and Emile Hirsch of Lords of Dogtown fame. The film follows the pair as the play a father and son duo of coroners who examine the body of a Jane Doe (unidentified female).

    Woah, where do I even begin? This is the horror genre at one of its finest, André transports us into this chilling world of the Tilden’s as they examine the beautiful body of a Jane Doe.

    One would expect an extremely gore (torture porn-esque) film as the title would suggest but André sways away a bit by adding a few elements that push the film forward and make it into such a triumph and gem of the genre.

    The air of mystery is created as the film progresses when we want to learn more about the origins of this beautiful body, but not just the mystery behind the body but also mystery behind the relationship of our two characters, at first glance all seems well but we move, a few details are revealed and we see that their relationship is not perfect and is a stereotypical father-son relationship that we’ve become accustomed to but it’s not eye roll worthy because we rarely dwell on their relationship together but more on their individual state of minds.

    Jane Doe’s own history is revealed through her examination and her character arc finally delivers a witch movie that casts a spell on us and instills fear into the viewers.

    André is able to tease us with the brilliant use of plot points and genre tropes that keep us glued while creating this eerie supernatural suspense that keeps us guessing what’s going to happen next?! The more we learn about Jane Doe and the more “gruesome” the examination gets the more horrific the horror gets. Delivering a smart, creepy and visually pleasing horror film.

    Roman Osin’s cinematography is great here with his pictures portraying an art-house – semi gore – supernatural film that almost suffocated me as I went along because of the movements of the characters and their eventual stand still and realization that the end is nigh and they are doomed, and with a colour scheme that evolves and develops as the film itself progresses forward.

    A must watch for my fellow horror lovers.

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